Return to Expand Access to MAT

Law enforcement seizures of buprenorphine drugs, which include Suboxone and generics, has increased from 90 to 10,537 packages between 2003 and 2010, according to the latest report from National Forensic Laboratory Information System (NFLIS), which the DEA uses to monitor diversion.

Buprenorphine was approved in May 2016 in a long-lasting implant option that provides a continuous low dose for 6 months. This is used along with supporting treatment as a person is ramped down to a relatively low dose, often after about 6 months of Medication-Assisted Treatment using a pill form of Buprenorphine.[1]

Although it is used for treatment, buprenorphine is commonly abused.[2] 'Bupe' is the third most diverted prescription opiate after those containing oxycodone and hydrocodone.[3]

Sources

(1) http://www.cbsnews.com/news/charleston-shooting-suspect-dylann-roof-drug-suboxone/
  1. ^ http://www.startribune.com/fda-approves-first-drug-oozing-implant-to-control-addiction/381010061/
  2. ^ Lavonas, Eric J., et al. "Abuse and diversion of buprenorphine sublingual tablets and film." Journal of substance abuse treatment 47.1 (2014): 27-34.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074054721400035X
  3. ^ http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-to-treat-an-opioid-epidemic-1484323662